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Telehealth and consults on line

As the restriction are in place and no more myotherapy, massage for a bit. I am now adding an online component to the business. In setting up an exercise rehabilitation program corrective exercise. Personal at-home programs to help you through your aches and pains, and on line education.

 If there is any topics you would like me to do a video about or a fact sheet just let me know.

I have already put together 2 facts sheets for lower back pain and shoulders. For everyone setting up at home office how it best to set up the desk for your posture. Let me know if you would be interested in these.

I also have available massage oils blends you can buy. Have 8 selected blends.  Bonus is I am also able to make a personalized blend to you.

 Hope to hear or video with you all soon.

Stay safe

Elicia

EBmyotherapy

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How to Improve your Immune System Naturally

As there is a few things going around, here natural ways to boost your immune system

Start of with what we can eat.

15 Foods That Boost the Immune System

1. Citrus fruits

2. Red bell peppers

3. Broccoli

4. Garlic

5. Ginger

6. Spinach

7. Yogurt

8. Almonds

9. Turmeric

10. Green tea

11. Papaya

12. Kiwi

13. Poultry

14. Sunflower seeds

15. Shellfish

How to boost your immune system

  • Don’t smoke.
  • Eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Get adequate sleep.
  • Take steps to avoid infection, such as washing your hands frequently and cooking meats thoroughly.
  • Try to minimize stress.

Vitamins That Are Best for Boosting Your Immunity

  • Vitamin C is one of the biggest immune system boosters of all. In fact, a lack of vitamin C can even make you more prone to getting sick. Foods rich in vitamin C include oranges, grapefruits, tangerines, strawberries, bell peppers, spinach, kale and broccoli. Daily intake of vitamin C is essential for good health because your body doesn’t produce or store it. The good news is that vitamin C is in so many foods that most people don’t need to take a vitamin C supplement unless a doctor advises it.
  • Vitamin B6 is vital to supporting biochemical reactions in the immune system. Vitamin B6-rich foods include chicken and cold water fish such as salmon and tuna. Vitamin B6 also is found in green vegetables and in chickpeas, which is the main ingredient in hummus.
  • Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant that helps the body fight off infection. Foods rich in vitamin E include nuts, seeds and spinach.

If you have any question Contact us on the contact form below

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Benefits of Drinking Tea

Here are few benefits of drinking tea but in moderation.

Tea can boost exercise endurance.

Drinking tea could help reduce the risk of heart attack. Tea might also help protect against cardiovascular and degenerative diseases.

Tea helps fight free radicals.

Tea is hydrating to the body

Drinking tea is linked with a lower risk of Parkinson’s disease.

Tea might provide protection from ultraviolet rays.

Tea could keep waist circumference in check.

Regular tea drinking might also counteract some of the negative effects of smoking

Tea could be beneficial to people with Type 2 diabetes.

Tea can help the body recover from radiation.

Green tea has been found to improve bone mineral density and strength.

Tea might be an effective agent in the prevention and treatment of neurological diseases

Tea contains antioxidants.

Tea has less caffeine than coffee.

Tea may keep your smile bright

Tea may boost the immune system

Tea may help battle cancer

Herbal tea may soothe the digestive system

Tea — unadulterated, that is — is calorie-free

Precautions of drinking too much tea: High amounts of black tea can cause side effects due to the caffeine in black tea. These side effects can range from mild to serious and include headache, nervousness, sleep problems, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, irregular heartbeat, tremor, heartburn, dizziness, ringing in the ears, convulsions, and confusion.

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How to improve your circulation

Signs and symptoms poor circulation

Numbness, tingling, and pain in the arms or legs may be symptoms of poor circulation.

If blood flow is reduced to a certain part of a person’s body, they may experience the signs and symptoms of poor circulation.

The following symptoms mainly occur in the arms or legs. They include:

  • throbbing
  • stinging
  • numbness
  • tingling
  • cramps
  • pain
  • warmth or coolness
  • swelling

Can You Increase Your Blood Flow with Vitamins

Vitamins and supplements for increased blood flow

Many people suffer the effects of poor circulation. If you often experience cold hands or feet, you may be among them. Not only can this be uncomfortable, but it can negatively impact your health.

For example, your cognitive function can decline if your brain is receiving inadequate blood supply.

There are vitamins, minerals, and supplements that many believe can help improve your circulation. For example:

  • Vitamin E– You can easily incorporate this vitamin into your diet by preparing foods using oils like wheat germ and sunflower oils and other nut oils. Also, you can purchase food-grade vitamin E oil at most natural food stores and even many grocery stores.
  • B vitamins. You will find vitamin B supplements are most pharmacy and vitamin aisles. Leafy green vegetables like spinach and kale are great sources of these vitamins.
  • Iron. This mineral is available in supplement form which makes it easy to ingest an adequate amount. It’s possible to get enough iron through your diet too, by eating a lot of red meats and leafy green vegetables. Because of the cardiovascular risks associated with red meat, your doctor may advise you to choose the supplement and leafy greens instead of increasing your red meat intake.

Herbs that improve blood circulation

Many vitamin supplements contain herbs that natural health advocates believe promote circulation throughout the body. Here are some of the most popular:

  • bacopa (Bacopa monnieri)
  • black peppe (Piper nigrum)
  • butcher’s broom (Ruscus aculeatus)
  • cayenne (Capsicum annuum)
  • chickweed (Stellaria media)
  • ginger (Zingiber officinale)
  • gotu kota (Centella asiatica)
  • hawthorn (Crataegus)
  • maidenhair (Ginkgo biloba)
  • thyme (Thymus vulgaris)
  • turmeric (Curcuma longa)

Improving circulation naturally

In addition to taking vitamins and supplements to boost your blood flow, you can improve your body’s circulation by leading a healthy lifestyle that incorporates the following:

  • Exercise. This is among the top methods for getting your blood flowing. Because the heart is at the center of the body’s blood flow, it’s important to have a healthy heart if you aim for optimal circulation everywhere in your body.
  • Stress Management. When a patient has poor circulation, doctors often ask them about their stress levels. This is because when the body experiences stress, blood vessels constrict. Learning to manage your stress is a great way to complement other things you are doing to improve your circulation.
  • Massage. Not only can a massage help with stress management, but it also helps improve circulation through the lymphatic and cardiovascular systems. When the muscles are manipulated effectively by a professional, your body releases chemicals called endorphins that make you feel good. Some massage therapists even offer treatment using essential oils that may help improve blood flow, such as Rosemary and Sage.
  • Fluid intake. Blood has a very high water content. Keeping your body hydrated is an easy way to maintain or improve your circulation.
  • Stopping smoking. Smoke causes blood vessels to constrict, decreasing the amount of blood that is able to flow through those vessels.

How to improve circulation

Avoiding a sedentary lifestyle may help to improve circulation. Jogging and avoiding sitting still for too long are both steps to take.

If a person wants to improve their circulation, there are some obvious places to start. These include:

  • stopping smoking tobacco products
  • reducing intake of saturated fats
  • trying not to sit still for long periods

In addition, trying one or more of the following may help improve circulation:

1. Maintaining a healthy weight

Maintaining a healthy weight helps promote good circulation. If a person is overweight, it may negatively affect their circulation.

In a 2009 study it was found that losing weight improved circulation for women who were overweight. The participants increased their levels of a protein called adiponectin that is associated with vascular function.

2. Jogging

Regular cardiovascular exercise, such as jogging, supports the health of the circulatory system and improves circulation.

noted that exercise improves the body’s ability to take in and use oxygen. It also improves the capacity of blood vessels to dilate, which helps them work more efficiently, allowing the muscles to receive oxygen more easily.

These benefits of exercise improve circulation and mean that daily activities may be less tiring.

3. Practicing yoga

is a low-impact exercise that is easy to modify for beginners. It involves bending, stretching, and twisting. These movements can help to compress and decompress a person’s veins, which may improve circulation.

An Article in 2014 published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found yoga was beneficial for the cardiovascular system and a person’s metabolism.

A simple yoga position for beginners to try is the downward-facing dog. This helps improve circulation as it puts the hips and heart above the head, allowing gravity to increase blood flow towards the head.

To do the downward-facing dog, a person should:

  • start on all fours, with shoulders above wrists, and hips above knees
  • breathe in
  • push hips backward and up into the air while exhaling
  • straighten the arms and legs
  • press firmly into the hands
  • breathe deeply, lifting and pressing down each heel in turn to deepen the stretch
  • let the neck relax
  • stay in position for three deep breaths
  • slowly lower hips back into starting position

4. Eating oily fish

The Omega-3 fatty acids in oily fish promote cardiovascular health and improve circulation

Oily fish include:

  • salmon
  • mackerel
  • sardines
  • tuna

For those who are vegetarian or vegan, kale contains a small amount of omega-3 fatty acid.

Supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids are another option for people who do not eat fish. A range of omega-3 supplements is available for purchase in health food stores and pharmacies.

5. Drinking tea

The Antioxidants in tea promote cardiovascular health and may improve circulation. This is true for both black and green tea

A study in 2003, published in the journal Circulation, found that black tea improves blood vessel health. Healthy blood vessels help improve circulation.

6. Keeping iron levels balanced

Iron is an essential mineral for the circulatory system. It is required to make hemoglobin, one of the major components of red blood cells, which is needed to carry oxygen.

Eating foods rich in iron, such as red meat or spinach, helps the body maintain this essential mineral. However, maintaining a healthful balance is necessary as well.

Too much iron may negatively affect cardiovascular health. A 2013 study found a link between having too much iron in the body and cardiovascular disease in people with high cholesterol and higher waist circumference measurements.

Causes and risk factors

Low blood pressure may affect circulation.

The health of a person’s circulatory system determines how well the blood circulates through their body. The factors that affect this include:

Blood pressure

is the pressure of the blood on the walls of the blood vessels as it circulates. Blood pressure is measured by “systolic” pressure over “diastolic” pressure.

Systolic pressure is the pressure on the blood vessel wall during the heartbeat when the lower chambers of the heart are pumping blood forward.

Diastolic pressure is the pressure on the blood vessel wall when the lower chambers of the heart are at rest and filling with blood.

According to the American Heart Association a normal resting blood pressure in an adult is no more than 120 millimeters (mm) of mercury (Hg) systolic and no more than 80 mm for diastolic. This is abbreviated to 120/80 mmHg.

People with very low blood pressure may experience poor circulation and other related symptoms. However, having a lower blood pressure measurement is not usually a cause for concern in people with a healthy cardiovascular system.

Blood health

The blood carries oxygen and nutrients and removes waste and does these jobs best when it is healthy.

Healthy blood has the right levels of normal red blood cells, which carry oxygen, white blood cells, and platelets. These components are all made in the bone marrow.

Heart health

The heart is the muscle responsible for pumping a person’s blood around their body. The stronger and healthier a person’s heart is, the better their circulation.

Blood vessel health

Having healthy veins and arteries makes it easier for the blood to pass through them. If a person’s lipid or fat or their cholesterol levels are too high or low, the blood vessels can become injured and blocked.

Other causes

Poor circulation may be a symptom of other underlying health conditions. These include:

  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • heart conditions
  • conditions affecting the arteries or veins

Exercise and other measures to promote cardiovascular health may reduce poor circulation caused by these conditions.

When to see a doctor

If a person experiences the symptoms of poor circulation, it is important that they speak to a doctor. A doctor can help diagnose what might be the problem and suggest treatment for any underlying conditions.

In addition, they may suggest eating a healthful diet, exercising regularly, and quitting smoking to improve circulation.

Outlook

There are many ways to boost your circulation. Whether you’re looking to increase total body circulation or improve blood flow to your penis, many health and wellness practitioners suggest using vitamins and supplements.

You’ll get the best results if you work alongside your doctor, who can design a plan tailored specifically to your health profile and help you avoid potentially negative side effects.

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What Kind of Headache are you having?

Many of us are familiar with some form of the throbbing, uncomfortable, and distracting pain of a headache. This article will explain 10 different types of headaches:

  • tension headaches
  • cluster headaches
  • migraine allergy or sinus headaches
  • hormone headaches
  • caffeine headaches
  • exertion headaches
  • hypertension headaches
  • rebound headaches
  • post-traumatic headaches

.

Although headaches can be defined as pain “in any region of the head,” the cause, duration, and intensity of this pain can vary according to the type of headache.

In some cases, a headache may require immediate medical attention. Seek immediate medical care if you’re experiencing any of the following alongside your headache:

  • stiff neck
  • rash
  • the worst headache you’ve ever had
  • vomiting
  • confusion
  • slurred speech
  • any fever of 100.4°F (38°C) or higher
  • paralysis in any part of your body or visual loss

If your headache is less severe, read on to learn how to identify the type of headache you may be experiencing and what you can do to ease your symptoms.

The most common primary headaches

Primary headaches occur when the pain in your head is the condition. In other words, your headache isn’t being triggered by something that your body is dealing with, like illness or allergies.

These headaches can be episodic or chronic:

Episodic headaches may occur every so often or even just once in a while. They can last anywhere from half an hour to several hours.

Chronic headaches are more consistent. They occur most days out of the month and can last for days at a time. In these cases, a pain management plan is necessary.

 

  1. Tension headaches

If you have a tension headache, you may feel a dull, aching sensation all over your head. It isn’t throbbing. Tenderness or sensitivity around your neck, forehead, scalp, or shoulder muscles also might occur.

Anyone can get a tension headache, and they’re often triggered by stress.

When a tension headache becomes chronic, a different course of action may be suggested to address the underlying headache trigger.

  1. Cluster headaches

Cluster headaches are characterized by severe burning and piercing pain. They occur around or behind one eye or on one side of the face at a time. Sometimes swelling, redness, flushing, and sweating can occur on the side that’s affected by the headache. Nasal congestion and eye tearing also often occur on the same side as the headache.

These headaches occur in a series. Each individual headache can last from 15 minutes to three hours. Most people experience one to four headaches a day, usually around the same time each day, during a cluster. After one headache resolves, another will soon follow.

A series of cluster headaches can be daily for months at a time. In the months between clusters, individuals are symptom-free. Cluster headaches are more common in the spring and fall. They are also three times more common in men.

Doctors aren’t sure what causes cluster headaches, but they do know some effective ways to treat the symptoms. Your doctor may recommend oxygen therapy, sumatriptan (Imitrex) or local anesthetic (lidocaine) to provide pain relief.

After a diagnosis is made, your doctor will work with you to develop a prevention plan. Corticosteroids, melatonin, topiramate (Topamax), and calcium channel blockers may put your cluster headaches into a period of remission.

  1. Migraine

Migraine pain is an intense pulsing from deep within your head. This pain can last for days. The headache significantly limits your ability to carry out your daily routine. Migraine is throbbing and usually one-sided. People with migraine headaches are often sensitive to light and sound. Nausea and vomiting also usually occur.

Some migraine is preceded by visual disturbances. About one out of five people will experience these symptoms before the headache starts. Known as an aura, it may cause you to see:

flashing lights

shimmering lights

zigzag lines

stars

blind spots

Auras can also include tingling on one side of your face or in one arm and trouble speaking. However, the symptoms of a stroke can also mimic a migraine, so if any of these symptoms are new to you, you should seek immediate medical attention.

Migraine attacks might run in your family, or they can be associated with other nervous system conditions. Women are three times more likely to develop migraine than men. People with post-traumatic stress disorder also have an increased risk for migraine.

Certain environmental factors, such as sleep disruption, dehydration, skipped meals, some foods, hormone fluctuations, and exposure to chemicals are common migraine triggers.

If OTC pain relievers don’t reduce your migraine pain during an attack, your doctor might prescribe triptans. Triptans are drugs that decrease inflammation and change the flow of blood within your brain. They come in the form of nasal sprays, pills, and injections.

If you experience headaches that are debilitating more than three days a month, headaches that are somewhat debilitating four days a month, or any headaches at least six days per month, talk to your doctor about taking a daily medication to prevent your headaches.

The most common secondary headaches

Secondary headaches are a symptom of something else that is going on in your body. If the trigger of your secondary headache is ongoing, it can become chronic. Treating the primary cause generally brings headache relief.

  1. Allergy or sinus headaches

Headaches sometimes happen as a result of an allergic reaction. The pain from these headaches is often focused in your sinus area and in the front of your head.

Migraine headaches are commonly misdiagnosed as sinus headaches. In fact, up to 90 percent of “sinus headaches” are actually migraine. People who have chronic seasonal allergies or sinusitis are susceptible to these kinds of headaches.

Sinus headaches are treated by thinning out the mucus that builds up and causes sinus pressure. Nasal steroid sprays, OTC decongestants such as phenylephrine (Sudafed PE), or antihistamines such as cetirizine (Zyrtec D Allergy + Congestion) may help with this.

A sinus headache can also be a symptom of a sinus infection. In these cases, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics to clear the infection and relieve your headache and other symptoms.

  1. Hormone headaches

Women commonly experience headaches that are linked to hormonal fluctuations. Menstruation, birth control pills, and pregnancy all affect your estrogen levels, which can cause a headache. Those headaches associated specifically with the menstrual cycle are also known as menstrual migraine. These can occur right before, during, or right after menses, as well as during ovulation.

OTC pain relievers like naproxen (Aleve) or prescription medications like frovatripan (Frova) can work to control this pain.

It’s estimated that about 60 percent of women with migraine also experience menstrual migraine, so alternative remedies may have a role in decreasing overall headaches per month. Relaxation techniques, yoga, acupuncture, and eating a modified diet may help prevent migraine headaches.

  1. Caffeine headaches

Caffeine affects blood flow to your brain. Having too much can give you a headache, as can quitting caffeine “cold turkey.” People who have frequent migraine are at risk of triggering a headache due to their caffeine use.

When you’re used to exposing your brain to a certain amount of caffeine, a stimulant, each day, you might get a headache if you don’t get your caffeine fix. This may be because caffeine changes your brain chemistry, and withdrawal from it can trigger a headache.

Not everyone who cuts back on caffeine will experience a withdrawal headache. Keeping your caffeine intake at a steady, reasonable level — or quitting it entirely — can prevent these headaches from happening.

  1. Exertion headaches

Exertion headaches happen quickly after periods of intense physical activity. Weight lifting, running, and sexual intercourse are all common triggers for an exertion headache. It’s thought that these activities cause increased blood flow to your skull, which can lead to a throbbing headache on both sides of your head.

An exertion headache shouldn’t last too long. This type of headache usually resolves within a few minutes or several hours. Analgesics, such as aspirin and ibuprofen (Advil), should ease your symptoms.

If you develop exertion headaches, make sure to see your doctor. In some cases, they may be a sign of a serious underlying medication condition.

  1. Hypertension headaches

High blood pressure can cause you to have a headache, and this kind of headache signals an emergency. This occurs when your blood pressure becomes dangerously high.

A hypertension headache will usually occur on both sides of your head and is typically worse with any activity. It often has a pulsating quality. You may also experience changes in vision, numbness or tingling, nosebleeds, chest pain, or shortness of breath.

If you think you’re experiencing a hypertension headache, you should seek immediate medical attention.

You’re more likely to develop this type of headache if you’re treating high blood pressure.

These types of headaches typically go away soon after the blood pressure is under better control. They shouldn’t reoccur as long as high blood pressure continues to be managed.

  1. Rebound headaches

Rebound headaches, also known as medication overuse headaches, can feel like a dull, tension-type headache, or they may feel more intensely painful, like a migraine.

You may be more susceptible to this type of headache if you frequently use OTC pain relievers. Overuse of these medications leads to more headaches, rather than fewer.

Rebound headaches are likelier to occur any time OTC medications like acetaminophen, ibuprofen, aspirin, and naproxen are used more than 15 days out of a month. They’re also more common with medications that contain caffeine.

The only treatment for rebound headaches is to wean yourself off of the medication that you’ve been taking to control pain. Although the pain may worsen at first, it should completely subside within a few days.

A good way to prevent medication overuse headaches is to take a preventative daily medicine that doesn’t cause rebound headaches and prevents the headaches from occurring to begin with.

  1. Post-traumatic headaches

Post-traumatic headaches can develop after any type of head injury. These headaches feel like migraine or tension-type headaches, and usually last up to 6 to 12 months after your injury occurs. They can become chronic.

Triptans, sumatriptan (Imitrex), beta-blockers, and amitriptyline are often prescribed to control the pain from these headaches.

When to see your doctor

In most cases, episodic headaches will go away within 48 hours. If you have a headache that lasts more than two days or that increases in intensity, you should see your doctor for assistance.

If you’re getting headaches more than 15 days out of the month over a period of three months, you might have a chronic headache condition. You should see your doctor to find out what’s wrong, even if you’re able to manage the pain with aspirin or ibuprofen.

Headaches can be a symptom of more serious health conditions, and some do require treatment beyond OTC medications and home remedies.

Otc-over the counter